Recommended Reading: Techworld on Unified Access

I ran across a nice Techworld article that talks about the need for wireless to be as fast, reliable,and scalable as wired Ethernet. Namely, because of the number of new wireless devices on the network that don’t *have* Ethernet ports. However, this article goes beyond BYOD and talks about management and policy for a single Unified Access layer (Wired, Wireless, and VPN), which I believe is a growing trend.

You can read the story here:

http://news.techworld.com/networking/3374453/wireless-networks-need-catch-up-with-fixed-line-cisco/?olo=rss

802.11ad

One of my Enterprise customers asked me today about 802.11ad as a replacement for their 802.11n, and if they should wait for chipsets that support operation in 60 GHz.   Here’s what I  wrote back:

“802.11ad / 60GHz technology is most likely going to be used for short-range / high-capacity cable replacement (think wireless HDMI to home theater components).  The higher frequency doesn’t make it a candidate to replace the current use cases of today’s Wi-Fi.  Also, because of that different frequency band, it will not be backward compatible with 802.11n or legacyWi-Fi (802.11 a/b/g).  While there could ultimately be multiple chips in end-user / client devices, history suggests it’s not likely – most of the phone / tablet manufacturers today don’t implement chipsets for 2.4 GHz *and* 5 GHz largely due to battery life concerns.  Additionally, similar claims around having multiple chips for both Wi-Fi and Wi-Max were popular at one time, but were never widely productized. “

 

Get Pumped Up – It’s the Start of Another Work Week!

Here’s an inspiring video for you to start off your work week.  :)

Can I Get Some Help With AdSense and WordPress?

OK.  I need some help.  I signed up for a Google AdSense account, and I want to post the ads on WiFiJedi.com   I can seem to generate the proper code within AdSense, but it doesn’t seem to “take”, when I paste it into WordPress.   It  pastes into the text box, but then when I click publish (or save), it seems to “disappear”.

This happens when I paste it into either the “Visual” or “HTML” boxes. It also happens when I try to paste the AdSense code into either a text box along the side column of my main blog page, as well as when I try to enter the code at the bottom of one of my posts.

I should also mention that Word Press is hosting my blog.  I simply paid Word Press for the domain name and DNS redirect.  It’s *not* hosted by another hosting company such as Blue Host or Hosting Gator.  I think that limits my use of plug-ins.

Has anyone else experienced this before?  If so, what is the work around?

Location Tracking at the Mall

In my job as a Sales Engineer, one of the applications of wireless technology that I get asked about more and more these days is location tracking. At first, I used to get asked about how to track high-value assets. For example, hospitals would ask about how to track expensive (or rare) medical equipment. Or how to track items that were frequently stolen, such as wheel chairs. In this scenario, the equipment had to be tagged in order to track it’s location. Most often, this was done with an active RFID tag in 2.4 GHz which then ran across a wireless LAN as the data was being correlated at a central location server.

With the proliferation of Wi-Fi enabled devices such as smart phones and tablets, I now get asked about how to track the people carrying them. It seems that the general consensus is that tracking people offers much more valuable data than tracking physical assets. One such article that highlights this is one on Evan Schuman’s Storefront Backtalk entitled “Mobile Tracking At The Mall: The Potential Is Stunning”.

The location tracking mentioned in this article seems to be based on cellular frequencies. However, much more accurate location data can be accomplished via Wi-Fi. This is because there are more data points (Access Points) to triangulate from in a pervasive WLAN when compared to the number of data points (cell towers) in a mobile location tracking scenario.

As far back as a few years ago, the pre-cursors for these types of networks were being installed. Personally, I was involved in a project that deployed free guest Wi-Fi in the food courts of 65 malls across America. With their wireless LAN controllers, switches, and security devices already in-place, deploying a location tracking applications would simply consist of expanding the wireless footprint to include the proper density of APs, as well installing a location server or appliance.

Stadium Vision

Yesterday, I posted a link to a Light Reading article about in-stadium connectivity at the Staples Center downtown Los Angeles.  The project, by Verizon and Cisco Systems is called Stadium Vision.

If you are interested in learning *even more*, here is a link to a local news story about the project (which also includes a 2 minute video).  Exciting stuff!

What are Two Things That Make Me Smile? Hockey & Wireless!

OK, I thought I would pass along an interesting article where two of my passions – hockey and Cisco — intersect.   Here is an article on Light Reading about Cisco & Verizon updating the Staples Center in Los Angeles for in-stadium video.  Apparently it debuted at last night’s LA Kings game.

In-stadium connectivity is becoming increasingly more popular.  This article mentions controlling several different video angles.  I have a similar stand-alone device from Fan Vision that I use at Arizona Cardinals home games, although that works off of UHF technology.  Fan Vision — if you are listening, *please* expand into hockey.  PLEASE…

The light reading article I mentioned earlier also talks about fans ordering concessions from their seats.  This is something that we already have at Coyotes hockey through a vendor called Bypass.  I have tried to use the Bypass Lane at hockey games, but my in-stadium cellular signal isn’t sufficient to place the order, and there is a lack of public Wi-Fi.  What makes it particularly frustrating to me is that I know the arena *has* Wi-Fi, but they don’t segment a guest SSID for public consumption.  This would not only drive more sales for Bypass, but improve the overall fan experience.   I can also see in-stadium Wi-Fi making it easier for fans to post pictures, videos, etc. to their favorite social networking sites, which essentially extends the team’s brand outside of the event space.

The Light Reading article also mentions social networking, in the context of “digital dissing”.  I always thought they should run those boards on the jumbo tron where you text your message to a certain number, and then it plays your message.  Obviously, they would have to have some good content filtering, but it would be FUN.

While I am happy for the LA Kings and the Staples Center, the Kings are in town tomorrow night to take on *my* Phoenix Coyotes.  Let’s Go Coyotes!

ClientLink on the Beach

A colleague of mine on Cisco’s West Coast Mobility Sales Team, Jason Grant, produced a short (one minute) video about one of Wi-Fi product features, ClientLink.   However, instead of a dry technical description, he explained it using an interesting visual aid.  Take a look:

The Art of the Conference Call…

I have had many conversations in the past week about how email and conference calls have become a *huge* part of the work environment.   Personally, I am looking to become more effective & efficient at handling these tasks.  If you have a good strategy, please share!

Since it is Friday, I thought I would share a humorous video on the topic:

Thanks to my colleague, Henry Chou, for bringing this video to my attention.

Cisco Live 2011 Highlights

Well, on this first Friday of the new Fiscal Year, I had a few minutes to catch up on things.  One was to watch the Cisco Live 2011 Highlights video.  I happened to be up in Las Vegas supporting some of my accounts during the event (Vegas is a part of my territory).  Being new to Cisco,  I have to say that I was surprised as to how *BIG* Cisco Live really was.

It was being held at The Mandalay Bay, where I have attended INTEROP the last several years.  So I thought it was roughly the same size in terms of size and scope.  Wowers – I was *way* off.  Cisco Live was much bigger and more comprehensive.  In all fairness, I didn’t actually attend the event, but I can tell you in terms of signage, space, and presence of attendees, I was impressed.

By the way, since I wasn’t an attendee, I didn’t get one of the cool Cisco Live backpacks.  Let me know if you want to send one my way…

Pay close attention to the video around the 1:07 mark.  I believe you’ll catch a glimpse of Wi-Fi juggernaut, Andrew vonNagy (@revolutionwifi).

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